Neuropathic Pain: Symptoms, and Treatment

Injuries

Injuries to tissue, muscles, or joints are an uncommon cause of neuropathic pain. Likewise, back, leg, and hip problems or injuries can cause lasting damage to nerves.

While the injury may heal, the damage to the nervous system may not. As a result, you may experience persistent pain for many years after the accident.

Accidents or injuries that affect the spine can cause neuropathic pain, too. Herniated discs and spinal cord compression can damage the nerve fibers around your spine.

Infection

Infections rarely cause neuropathic pain.

Shingles, which is caused by reactivation of the chicken pox virus, can trigger several weeks of neuropathic pain along a nerve. Postherpetic neuralgia is a rare complication of shingles, involving persistent neuropathic pain.

A syphilis infection can also lead to the burning, stinging unexplained pain. People with HIV may experience this unexplained pain.

Limb loss

An uncommon form of neuropathic pain called phantom limb syndrome can occur when an arm or leg has been amputated. Despite the loss of that limb, your brain still thinks it’s receiving pain signals from the removed body part.

What’s actually happening, however, is that the nerves near the amputation are misfiring and sending faulty signals to your brain.

In addition to arms or legs, phantom pain may be felt in the fingers, toes, penis, ears, and other body parts.

Other causes

Other causes of neuropathic pain include: