Neuropathic Pain: Symptoms, and Treatment

Anticonvulsants

Anti-seizure medications and anticonvulsants are often used to treat neuropathic pain. Gabapentinoids are most commonly prescribed for neuropathic pain.

It’s not clear why anti-seizure drugs work for this condition, but researchers believe the medications interfere with pain signals and stop faulty transmissions.

Nerve blocks

Your doctor may inject steroids, local anesthetics, or other pain medications into the nerves that are thought to be responsible for the wayward pain signals. These blocks are temporary, so they must be repeated in order to keep working.

Implantable device

This invasive procedure requires a surgeon to implant a device in your body. Some devices are used in the brain and some are used in the spine.

Once a device is in place, it can send electrical impulses into the brain, spinal cord, or nerves. The impulses may stop the irregular nerve signals and control symptoms.

These devices are typically used only in individuals who haven’t responded well to other treatment options.

Lifestyle treatments

Physical, relaxation, and massage therapies are all used to relieve symptoms of neuropathic pain. These forms of treatment can help ease muscles.

Your healthcare provider can also teach you ways to cope with your pain.

For example, some people with neuropathic pain may experience increased symptoms after sitting for several hours. This might make desk jobs difficult to perform.

A physical therapist or occupational therapist can teach you techniques for sitting, stretching, standing, and moving to prevent pain.